Social Science & History Department

Faculty

Randy Grimmett 
Amanda Lanigan 
Sandy Lombardi
Rich MacAllister (Department Head)
Greg Rowe
Brian Smith

 

GRADE 9GRADE 10GRADE 11GRADE 12
World History II

Law

Sociology

 

 

 

U.S. History I

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

U.S. History II

A.P. U.S. History

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

A.P. Psychology

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

WORLD HISTORY II (1 Credit) (Grade 9)

Students study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They study the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political ethnic and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and is required for graduation.

U.S. HISTORY I (1 Credit) (Grade 10)

Students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. They learn about the important political and economic factors that contributed to the outbreak of the Revolution as well as the consequences of the Revolution, including the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution. Students also study the basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of America’s government such as popular sovereignty, federalism, separation of powers, and individual rights. Students study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, and economic and social change. Students will learn about the growth of sectional conflict, how sectional conflict led to the Civil War, and the consequences of the Civil War, including Reconstruction. Finally, students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and agrarian discontent. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and is required for graduation.

U.S. HISTORY II (1 Credit) (Grade 11)

Students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in diplomatic relations. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry to World War II as well as the consequences of World War II on American life. Finally students will study the causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, including Civil Rights movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and may be used to fulfill one of the two U.S. History credits required for graduation.

A.P. U.S. HISTORY (1 Credit) (Grade 11)

The United States History Advanced Placement course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials - their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance - and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students taking this course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.  The course is offered to students in the 11th grade, based upon the recommendation of the Department Chairperson.  This course may be used to fulfill one of the two U.S. History credits required for graduation.

A.P. PSYCHOLOGY (1 Credit) (Grade 12)

The Advanced Placement Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human behavior and other animals. The aim of this course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  The course is offered to the students in the 12th grade, based upon the recommendation of the Department Chairperson.

HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES:

AP MICROECONOMICS (1 Credit) (Grades 10-12) 

This is a rigorous college-level course.  The course utilizes the College Entrance Board’s AP Microeconomics syllabus.  Topics include basic economic concepts, thinking like an economist, benefits of trade, supply and demand, elasticity, costs of taxation, externalities, costs of production, competitive and monopolistic markets, market failures and the role of government in the economy.

HISTORY AND FILM (½ Credit) (Grades 11-12) (Not offered in the 2018 – 2019 school year)

This course will examine how film portrays history.  Activities will be research-based and will attempt to demonstrate the extent to which Hollywood has accurately represented actual historical events.

LAW (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12)

The course provides the student with an overview into the field of law. Subject matter covered includes civil, criminal, business, and domestic law issues. The course develops the student’s awareness of the controls placed on society by laws and regulations. Students participate in mock trials and other activities. The subject matter in the textbooks is augmented through the use of field trips and by classroom lectures provided by legal professionals who discuss their legal experiences with the students. The completion of this course will result in a well-balanced understanding of the complexities of law and the practice of preparing convincing and substantial arguments.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES (½ Credit) (Grades 10 – 12)

From the Salem Witch Trials to the attack on the World Trade Center towers, Americans have had a healthy obsession with conspiracy theories.  The purpose of this course is to examine some of the more popular conspiracy theories from America’s history, critically and with a logical analytical basis.  While some of these theories seem to most people to be the result of an active imagination (and, perhaps, a little paranoia), others appear to have a good deal of factual support behind them.  Topics may include any of the following:  9/11/2001; the Kennedy and Lincoln assassinations; the Illuminati and New World Order; FDR and the Pearl Harbor attack; Roswell, New Mexico and Area 51; and the role of the Freemasons in the founding of the United States.

POP CULTURE (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12) (Not offered in the 2018 – 2019 school year)

This elective will deal with the history of pop culture in the United States since its inception.  Specific attention will be paid to the role that pop culture has played in American society, in its various forms.

PSYCHOLOGY (½ Credit) (Grades 10 - 12)

This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge and an understanding of the nature of psychology and psychological theory. Through this process, the student is acquainted with what modern research has discovered in regard to the process of learning. In addition, the student may acquire knowledge of patterns of human behavior and an understanding of varied patterns of behavior. This course will also examine personality in three different areas: the formation of personality, measurement of personality, and various theories of personality. The formation of personality will concentrate on defining personality and examining the main forces of personality.   (Priority is given to Grade 12 students).

SOCIOLOGY (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12)

This course is a study of the structure of our society in particular and the world society in general and its impact on our life. It develops an understanding of the evolution of our culture and society and sociological problems in contemporary life, the basic needs of the individual in society and the collective behavior of individuals in society. This course is also designed to show the influence of family on the individual. Since many of our attitudes, values, beliefs, political opinions, and career aspirations can be traced directly to the influence of the family coupled with the fact that much of our personality is directly attributable to our family, the family unit, and its relationship to social issues confronting our society is studied in depth.

Grade 10 students annually go on a field trip to Boston. Students walked the Freedom Trail. In the picture below, students learned about Ben Franklin at America’s 1st public school.

Mock Trials is team of student attorneys and witnesses who compete against other high school teams in mock trials held at local courthouses. The RHS Mock Trial team finished 2-1 last season, barely missing postseason play.

Rockland High School students participated in a simulated federal legislative exercise. During the overnight conference (in Boston), students engaged in controversial debates on topics which included the role of media in politics, immigration, and health care. Students, acting as delegates, further developed their research, writing, and public speaking skills. RHS was proud to have 22 students participate in HMC last year.

Social Science & History Department

Faculty

Randy Grimmett (Department Head)
Amanda Lanigan 
Sandy Lombardi
Rich MacAllister
Greg Rowe
Brian Smith

Updates From the Department 11-13-18

World History II: Grade 9 - Students learned about the “Growth of the Nation State” focusing on the centralization of absolute power in Europe, England’s exception to absolutism, as well as the unification of Germany, unification of Italy, and the economic, political, social, and technological factors leading to the agricultural and industrial revolutions. Subtopics included the Glorious Revolution, Enlightenment, American Revolution, French Revolution, Napoleonic Wars, Latin American Independence, and the Chinese Revolution of 1911.

United States History I: Grade 10  - Students learned about the colonization of the Americas and how European ideologies like the Enlightenment and Great Awakening impacted its cultural identity. Subtopics included comparing and contrasting of the New England, Chesapeake, and Southern colonies, as well as the developing of a Triangular Trade Route and the implementation of slavery. Students were also taught the various economic, political, and social causes of the American Revolution. The chronology of history is briefly stopped to complete a unit on Civics. Subtopics included the Articles of Confederations’ failures, Shays Rebellion vs Whiskey Rebellion, and an indepth look at the Constitution and its three branches of government. Students start, but won’t finish until November, a unit on Republicanism, with a review of the “Era of Good Feelings” and “Jacksonian Democracy”

United States History II - Students started the year by reviewing the Second Industrial Revolution, some of the subtopics from this unit were covered by USI teachers the previous year, including the various causes of industrialization, its impact on America’s cultural and socioeconomic groups, as well as the importance of immigration and their labor. Teachers also taught the Progressive Era, which subtopics include, Muckraking, Temperance, Women, Civil, and Immigrant rights, as well as a comparison between the progressive presidencies of Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson.

Advanced Placement United States History- Students spent the first week reviewing their summer analysis on the success of the Reconstruction Era. From there, students were introduced to Westward Expansion, The Second Industrial Revolution, The Progressive Era, Imperialism, World War I, and the Roaring 20’s. All notes and resources are provided on the courses’ google classroom, allowing for greater in depth discussion during the day, and an opportunity to master the various skills assessed by the College Boards’ APUSH exam in May. All assessments are based on the College Board’s APUSH exam, which include Document Based Multiple Choice Questions, Document Based Short Answer Responses, a Document Based Essay, and a Long Essay.

Electives:

American Conspiracies - Students have already successfully reviewed 5 conspiracy theories. Topics included are Flat Earth, JFK Assassination, Moon Landing, Aliens, and MK Ultra. Students began the year by researching the psychological roots of conspiracy theories, and developing the six tests for evaluating conspiracy theories. For each theory, students research the history of the events, followed by the causes and effects of the conspiracy. Students are encouraged, through their research, to develop their own opinion and arguments on the conspiracy, helping to make the learning more student driven.

Law- Students have been taught, criminal law and procedure, including sources of criminal law, the nature of criminal responsibility, elements of various crimes, affirmative defenses, criminal procedures (from arrest through conviction and appeal); Torts, including the difference between criminal and civil liability, various tort causes of action (negligence, slander, etc.), and defense to tort actions, all taught using the case method and socratic dialogue to formatively assess student understanding.

Sociology- Students have been taught and introduction to Sociology, including Sociology’s place within the social sciences, major theoretical perspectives (functionalism, conflict theory, interactionist theory, social darwinism) and early sociologist like Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Spencer. Students have also reviewed culture, including the element of culture (artifacts, norms, values, language, symbols), levels of culture (trait, complex, pattern), and variations in culture (subcultures and countercultures). Students recently reviewed Personality Development, including the nature vs nurture debate, major theories of personality development and major sociologist in the field, (John Locke, Charles Horton Cooley, and George Herbert Meade).

AP Psychology - Material taught includes a background and introduction to Psychology, where students analyze the meaning and study of Psychology both past and present. Student also reviewed the various fields and professions of psychology as well as famous psychologies both past and present. Early on, students analyzed the various methods of research including case studies, natural observation, surveys, and experiments. More recently, students have been taught the “State of Consciousness” in particular, sleep and dreams, as well as hypnosis and meditation. Students have also just began to review the biology behind psychology as well as a look at the importance of the brain and brain function regarding ones psychology.  

Psychology - Students began the year researching the background of psychology, what psychologist study, and the various fields and professions of psychology. Students also learned the different types of methods of research, including case studies, natural observation, surveys, and experiments. More recently students worked on sleep and dreams, hypnosis and meditation, and the concepts of sociology in relation to psychology.

GRADE 9GRADE 10GRADE 11GRADE 12
World History II

Law

Sociology

 

 

 

U.S. History I

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

U.S. History II

A.P. U.S. History

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

A.P. Psychology

Psychology

Sociology

Law

American Conspiracies

AP Microeconomics

WORLD HISTORY II (1 Credit) (Grade 9)

Students study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They study the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political ethnic and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and is required for graduation.

U.S. HISTORY I (1 Credit) (Grade 10)

Students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. They learn about the important political and economic factors that contributed to the outbreak of the Revolution as well as the consequences of the Revolution, including the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution. Students also study the basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of America’s government such as popular sovereignty, federalism, separation of powers, and individual rights. Students study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, and economic and social change. Students will learn about the growth of sectional conflict, how sectional conflict led to the Civil War, and the consequences of the Civil War, including Reconstruction. Finally, students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and agrarian discontent. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and is required for graduation.

U.S. HISTORY II (1 Credit) (Grade 11)

Students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in diplomatic relations. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry to World War II as well as the consequences of World War II on American life. Finally students will study the causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, including Civil Rights movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. This course is offered at the College Prep and Honors levels, and may be used to fulfill one of the two U.S. History credits required for graduation.

A.P. U.S. HISTORY (1 Credit) (Grade 11)

The United States History Advanced Placement course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials - their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance - and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students taking this course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.  The course is offered to students in the 11th grade, based upon the recommendation of the Department Chairperson.  This course may be used to fulfill one of the two U.S. History credits required for graduation.

A.P. PSYCHOLOGY (1 Credit) (Grade 12)

The Advanced Placement Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human behavior and other animals. The aim of this course is to provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses. Students will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They will also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  The course is offered to the students in the 12th grade, based upon the recommendation of the Department Chairperson.

HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES:

AP MICROECONOMICS (1 Credit) (Grades 10-12) 

This is a rigorous college-level course.  The course utilizes the College Entrance Board’s AP Microeconomics syllabus.  Topics include basic economic concepts, thinking like an economist, benefits of trade, supply and demand, elasticity, costs of taxation, externalities, costs of production, competitive and monopolistic markets, market failures and the role of government in the economy.

HISTORY AND FILM (½ Credit) (Grades 11-12) (Not offered in the 2018 – 2019 school year)

This course will examine how film portrays history.  Activities will be research-based and will attempt to demonstrate the extent to which Hollywood has accurately represented actual historical events.

LAW (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12)

The course provides the student with an overview into the field of law. Subject matter covered includes civil, criminal, business, and domestic law issues. The course develops the student’s awareness of the controls placed on society by laws and regulations. Students participate in mock trials and other activities. The subject matter in the textbooks is augmented through the use of field trips and by classroom lectures provided by legal professionals who discuss their legal experiences with the students. The completion of this course will result in a well-balanced understanding of the complexities of law and the practice of preparing convincing and substantial arguments.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES (½ Credit) (Grades 10 – 12)

From the Salem Witch Trials to the attack on the World Trade Center towers, Americans have had a healthy obsession with conspiracy theories.  The purpose of this course is to examine some of the more popular conspiracy theories from America’s history, critically and with a logical analytical basis.  While some of these theories seem to most people to be the result of an active imagination (and, perhaps, a little paranoia), others appear to have a good deal of factual support behind them.  Topics may include any of the following:  9/11/2001; the Kennedy and Lincoln assassinations; the Illuminati and New World Order; FDR and the Pearl Harbor attack; Roswell, New Mexico and Area 51; and the role of the Freemasons in the founding of the United States.

POP CULTURE (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12) (Not offered in the 2018 – 2019 school year)

This elective will deal with the history of pop culture in the United States since its inception.  Specific attention will be paid to the role that pop culture has played in American society, in its various forms.

PSYCHOLOGY (½ Credit) (Grades 10 - 12)

This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge and an understanding of the nature of psychology and psychological theory. Through this process, the student is acquainted with what modern research has discovered in regard to the process of learning. In addition, the student may acquire knowledge of patterns of human behavior and an understanding of varied patterns of behavior. This course will also examine personality in three different areas: the formation of personality, measurement of personality, and various theories of personality. The formation of personality will concentrate on defining personality and examining the main forces of personality.   (Priority is given to Grade 12 students).

SOCIOLOGY (½ Credit) (Grades 9 – 12)

This course is a study of the structure of our society in particular and the world society in general and its impact on our life. It develops an understanding of the evolution of our culture and society and sociological problems in contemporary life, the basic needs of the individual in society and the collective behavior of individuals in society. This course is also designed to show the influence of family on the individual. Since many of our attitudes, values, beliefs, political opinions, and career aspirations can be traced directly to the influence of the family coupled with the fact that much of our personality is directly attributable to our family, the family unit, and its relationship to social issues confronting our society is studied in depth.

Grade 10 students annually go on a field trip to Boston. Students walked the Freedom Trail. In the picture below, students learned about Ben Franklin at America’s 1st public school.

Mock Trials is team of student attorneys and witnesses who compete against other high school teams in mock trials held at local courthouses. The RHS Mock Trial team finished 2-1 last season, barely missing postseason play.

Rockland High School students participated in a simulated federal legislative exercise. During the overnight conference (in Boston), students engaged in controversial debates on topics which included the role of media in politics, immigration, and health care. Students, acting as delegates, further developed their research, writing, and public speaking skills. RHS was proud to have 22 students participate in HMC last year.

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